WHOLE Life Action Hour – Zach Bush, MD – Jul. 6th 2019

WHOLE Life Action Hour – Zach Bush, MD – Jul. 6th 2019


– Welcome, welcome, welcome! This is Ocean Robbins welcoming you to today’s Whole Life Action hour. Every month we have another action hour, with a brilliant health revolutionary. Today we’re gonna be focusing
on gut and digestive health with the extraordinary Dr. Zach Bush. More on that in just a moment. First a little bit of context. Whole Life Action hours are
a project of Whole Life Club Food Revolution Network’s
membership community, and as members receive
all of these action hours and the chance to submit
questions in advance plus transcripts and followup
action checklists and recipes and community and a
lot of other resources. We share these action hours
with our entire community because we want you to have
access to this information and this inspiration and this support. Welcome, welcome. We are so glad you are
here with us right now. Our gut is kind of a big deal. It forms the basis of
everything that happens in our brain and in our bodies. Right now more than 70 million people are suffering from some
form of digestive problem. From heartburn and acid
reflux, to GERD, IBS, leaky gut, autoimmune
disorders, and many more. Research is showing us
that the health of your gut impacts the health of your
brain, your immune system, your mental health, your physical health. Everything you experience in your life, and today we’re going to be joined by Dr. Zach Bush for an
eye opening discussion on digestive health and
simple steps you can take to nourish your microbiome. We’ll be talking about
probiotics, prebiotics, the best and worst foods for your gut, how your household, your
lifestyle, your environment, influence your digestion, and we’re gonna talk
about how you can nourish your microbiome to boost
every function in your body. Our topic is Listen to your Gut The Foundation of Human Health. We’re joined today by Zach Bush MD. One of the few triple board certified physicians in the world, with expertise in internal medicine, endocrinology and metabolism, and also hospice and palliative care. The breakthrough science that Dr. Bush and his colleagues have delivered, offers profound new insights into our modern disease epidemics, as well as human health and longevity. Dr. Bush’s mission is to catalyze radical change in the mega industries of big farming, big pharma,
and Western medicine at large, and he aims to empower you, with the leading edge knowledge that you need to support healthy digestion and a vibrant life. Zach, I’m just so happy you’re here. I’ve been a fan for a long time. I’m thrilled to have this time with you. Welcome. – Thank you so much. Glad to be on with you all. A real honor to be here. – Beautiful. Well let’s just jump right in here. We’ve had so many
questions from our members in advance of this time together, asking about our microbiomes and our gut and what I want to start with is in the modern world we’re seeing an epidemic of diseases that were relatively unheard of in times past for previous eras of humans. Of course we’re living longer, but a lot of us are also living sicker, and a lot of that comes down to the gut, so what has gone wrong with our guts? – Very good. Yeah, good overview. I think while the average life expectancy certainly went up over the course of the 20th century there, we opened the 21st
century, by 2002 to 2005, the CDC making announcements that the generations
born after the year 2000, expected to be the first
generation of Americans to live shorter than their parents. So we’ve maybe hit this J curve effect where we’re starting to see
a drop in life expectancy and that’s playing out in
the chronic disease patterns that you’re describing there. Diseases never heard of
really before in the public would include things
like gluten sensitivity, corticoid steroid and adrenal disorders with chronic stress
disorders, bizarre insomnia, and psychosis disorders in
our children and adults, and the syndromes themselves, who heard of fibromyalgia in the 1970s? These things were really non existent. Autism, maybe being the
tip of the spear really, and its explosive growth in our children. Going from one in 5,000 children in 1975, to somewhere around one in 30 now, and so we’ve got this
explosive growth of disorder and unfortunately it seems to be affecting younger and younger generations. In my clinic we tend to
see about 20 year jump in familial conditions
that are not genetic, but environmental. Things like Type II Diabetes. Happened to grandma at 65. Her daughter gets at 45. Granddaughter gets it at 25, and great granddaughter has already got precocious puberty
and insulin resistance at age seven and eight years old. – They used to call it
adult onset diabetes. – Right. – [Ocean] Call it Type II because it’s not just adult anymore – Yeah, yeah, absolutely, and this was really actually how I discovered your
dad and a lot of other leaders in the field in the late 1990s. The science started coming, and then by 2005, 2007, Dr. Neal Barnard’s program
for reversing diabetes was really going in parallel
with your mission there with the food revolution, and you could see this
whole plant based science really emerging since the 1960s. Really becoming pertinent by the time we had the explosive disease epidemics of the 2000 to 2015 range. You guys have been in your
moment really since your debut just because you’ve
been writing this crest of inflammatory and
chronic disease disorders that are hitting the public at large. That was my genesis. I was a chemotherapy physician at the University of Virginia. Background in endocrinology metabolism, but we’re studying cancer, and its mechanisms of
dysfunction of metabolism or the way in which
nutrients hit those cells and working on nutrients that
would kill those cancer cells. Vitamin A compounds and the like, and come to realize that at the same time, Barnard’s writing his book
on reversing diabetes, we’d find out around the same time that cancer is being caused
by a shift in the gut and so this was a revolutionary idea. Completely disrupted the
concept of cancer really because we had thought that it was just a genetic injury that
accumulated over a lifetime. Then you get cancer. To find out that this was
an environmental injury that could happen in minutes, and it was related to a change in the type of species
of bacteria in the gut was too hard to handle for almost a decade and it’s not really until
the last four or five years that the industry started to embrace this at the basic science level, but if you go into any
oncology center with a cancer nobody’s gonna tell you that
diet’s gonna make a difference and nobody’s gonna tell
you that the microbiome is really ground zero for your stuff. It’s gonna be a rare oncologist, or neurooncologist that’s gonna
explain any of that to you. This is typical. We typically have about a 20 year lag, between basic science revelations and impact on clinical care. – That’s actually a bit new to me. That the science of the microbiome and its impact on cancer, so I imagine a lot of our
participants right now may be surprised to hear that as well. Can you explain a little bit more. How does that work? What are the mechanisms by which poor digestive or poor microbiome context will feed cancer, and what are the mechanisms by which a healthy microbiome will fight it? – Yeah, the mechanisms are
what we’ve been working on for the last seven years, but before I go into mechanisms, let’s talk about public health proof and evidence that this is evident. That this is at the foundation. First of all, as we started to do genetic sequencing very rapidly, we could start to tackle the complexity of the microbiome and its genomics. To give you a sense of
the complexity here, the human genome has 20,000 genes, which is actually a pretty
pathetically low number in the world of biology, because a flea has 30,000 genes, a fruit fly has 13,000 genes, and you sit somewhere between
a flea and a fruit fly in regard to your genetic complexity, which for me, I always feel like I need a big permission slip at the end of a lot of my days if I didn’t get my stuff done today, but hey, I’m only about
two thirds as complicated as a flea so I’m doing all right. So that sense of you know what, we are so bizarrely simply as
a genetic being, as a human, but we are an ecosystem. That’s what separates us really from the other eukaryotes
like an earthworm or something like that. We carry much more microbiome with us, so we really are a colony of intelligence in regard to life forms. We look towards that, and anywhere from 20 to
40,000 bacterial species ideal that we could be dreaming of, that is going to hold
around two million genes, and so compare the two million genes and all of their work, proteins and enzymes they’ll make, the detox pathways, the
metabolic and digestive pathways, compared to your 20,000 genes, so you’re logarithmically outnumbered by the work done by your microbiome. Certainly just in number, you’re outnumbered 10 to one, but at the genetic level,
it’s more like 100 to one. Really amazing amount
of genomic information. By the late 2000s as we
were starting to decode that genome of the gut, we started to realize that
people with colon cancer had a very significant
and repeatable injury at the microbiome level. Meaning that they were missing some specific species of microbiome. Breast cancer, same thing. You get a shift in the microbiome, looks to be part of this
transition towards cancer. If you biopsy the breast
itself, interestingly, if you look at a breast tumor, you find bacteria in there quite a lot, and it’s always got this dominant, doesn’t matter what type
of breast cancer you have. Estrogen positive, progesterone negative, HER2 negative positive, doesn’t matter, you’re gonna find methylobacterium
as the dominant species. In contrast if you go
biopsy the other breast, you find that in that same woman she has a different organic garden growing there in that breast. This has been revolutionary, and very difficult for our
field to really embrace, is the understanding that bacteria might be all over the body. We’ve been used to the
compartmentalization of our belief of the microbiome. Well there’s bacteria in the colon, and the small intestine. Maybe your sinuses, and your skin, but the idea that there’s bacteria in your bladder, in your urinary tracts, and kidneys, and the
tissues of your prostate or your breast or wall of your colon. This is really an emerging realization that our body is a complete
ecosystem through and through. Colonized with healthy
bacteria and the like. This shifting was happening, and by the time I left academia and my chemotherapy research, 2010, I was getting a pretty good sense that the nutrition was gonna win the game. I started a nutrition center. A plant based nutrition center in the poorest county in Virginia, really targeting the fifth generation poverty that was there, and figured if I could figure out a scalable technique for hitting that population with nutrition that would reverse chronic disease, then we could scale something
to the national level in the healthcare environment. That was my goal. Two years into that process, I find that a third of my patients, are adopting everything
I’ve asked them to do. I was kale juicing people into oblivion. Looks like you’re hitting
the green juice right there, and that kale juice was my passion and I loved the cruciferous vegetables for all their anti cancer
compounds and all this and I’m a go big or go
home type personality and so I was extreme in what
I was having my patients do. I was, if I didn’t turn them into some sort of green toned human being I was disappointed, so I was really pushing a lot
of nutrient into these people expecting the best, and about a third of them were miraculous, amazing ridiculous stories, of diabetes melting away and
heart disease melting away, cancers going into remission. All of this stuff that
had been in the literature for people like Esselstyn and Campbell and all these guys since the 1960s. A third of my patients were obeying the textbooks on that one. Another third were plateaued. Getting maybe a little bit of benefit but they would crank along and nothing, and a full third at least
were getting worse not better which was so confusing. I could actually make
their inflammation markers go up with kale. They were doing better on white bread and processed meat, than
they were on veggies, and this turned into my big
breakthrough ultimately, was wondering what the heck was going on in the nutrients within the kale that could be causing the
inflammatory reaction, and as it turns out kale is one of the highest residues
of herbicides and pesticides in our cruciferous vegetables, if they’re not organically grown. That was a late finding. I didn’t know that going into it, but what I did find, that was as we were guiding
into the story of kale, we realized that the
anti cancer compounds, anti inflammatory compounds
in all cruciferous vegetables had suddenly disappeared in
the course of two decades. We were dealing with a
fraction of nutrients in the tomato for example and these potent alkaloids
of the night shade categories out there, we could see this
drop in medicinal quality. One of the potent medicines
in the tomato for example is lycopene, and the tomato of today has almost no detectable lycopene in it. We’d seen this crash in micronutrients and alkaloid type medicines in our food over that 20 years, so I started studying science of the soil, and a colleague of mine brought in a white paper on soil science, and on page 40 of this huge white paper there’s this giant molecule, and the right end of this molecule, looked a lot like the
chemotherapy I used to design, and that was my mindblow. That was the sudden, we’ve been looking at
plants for 4,000 years to heal disease. What if the soil itself had
a deeper medicine to it? That got me into soil science, and my incredible PhD
chief science advisor is John Gilder. Brilliant guy out of Johns Hopkins, and he was the one to untangle the story of the impact of these molecules on the toxic food environment
that we have today, but in recognizing that we have this chemotherapeutic capacity, it was exciting because my chemotherapy was actually non toxic methodology for helping cells commit suicide. What it was was harnessing something we call redox signaling which is really the wireless communication and what’s happened when
you develop a cancer cell is you get total
isolation from the greater environment of the human body, and when a cell gets
isolated and can’t get signal from its adjoining members,
it starts to panic. It starts to think all that’s left in the environment and it’s fascinating that a single cell at that level has a drive for life. It decides to start proliferating. It’s like this is, I’m the only cell left, I better start to reproduce. However, a cell that’s
left alone like that starts to accumulate injury very quickly. It’s not good at recognizing where repair is needed, so it starts to rapidly accumulate genetic and otherwise
protein injuries in the cell. That precancerous lesion, that is this confused lonely cell that’s just fighting for life, starts to get to the point where it can’t repair itself anymore and when a cell can’t repair itself, now it gets to the point where all it can do is rapid division and so that creates a tumor and if that cell gets desperate enough it’ll start going
looking for blood supply, neural supply. It’ll start recruiting resources to grow faster, move around the body, become a metastatic cancer and ultimately kill the patient. The whole time not realizing that it’s part of a 70
trillion celled organism that’s doing fine. This one cell is what kills
a human being from cancer. It’s amazing that we’ve created this $470 billion chemotherapy industry out of these single cells
that just get lonely, lost, and confused, and don’t realize that the 99.99% of the
human being’s healthy so they try to take over biology thinking they’re the last thing standing. When we were using the Vitamin A compounds in the chemotherapy world, and when we used nutritional compounds, we can fuel the mitochondria, which is the microbiome
that lives inside our cells. These little bacteroid dudes
that have a viral genome. These guys start proliferating, and we get younger cells, and as we get proliferation, better signaling from the mitochondria, the cancer cell can finally kill itself. When we found these molecules in the soil it was the aha moment, of these things are made by
bacteria and fungi and soil. They have the ability then to talk through these carbon
redox signaling molecules to the mitochondria
which then would regulate whether a cell’s gonna repair or tip into cancer or tip into apoptosis and program cell suicide,
or whatever it is. A very exciting moment in my career where we had known there was a correlation between change in
microbiome and cancer risk. This put it all together, if certain species and bacteria and fungi, make specific substrates of
these carbon shaped snowflakes and we start to miss those signals, then we miss the chemotherapeutic communication system of our food system. – To perhaps grossly oversimplify, are you saying that there
are bacteria in soil that have the capacity to communicate to the mitochondria which
are another type of bacteria in the human cells? – Yes. – Which in turn have the capacity to tell cancer cells, look it’s okay. You’re part of an ecosystem. You’re not the only one. Look out and be part of
the community essentially. Rather than just focusing on yourself. – That’s right, and it goes far beyond. – [Ocean] Get them back into balance. – That’s exactly right, and I think a lot of people, a lot of biologists out there, are very comfortable saying that mitochondria are bacteria, but in fact they are this
double walled organism that lives inside our cells, proliferates or dies within our cells, inapparent of what our cell is doing. The biology textbooks out there, will depict two of these
little mitochondria sitting inside your cells, and they always do a cutaway of one of those mitochondria to show you it’s got a double wall thing
with these in a cool shape, and we’re told that it’s the power plant for the human cell. In fact, it makes it sound like it’s part of the human cell. It makes it sound like this is just one of those organelles within the human and there’s much time spent on mentioning these actually are non human organisms living inside our cells and it gets even weirder than that that there’s actually
three different species of mitochondria and we haven’t teased out all the reasons why that is, or what their subspecialty is
within this human metabolism human pathways of repair
and longevity fit. You inherit these
mitochondria from your mother, because there’s no
mitochondria in the sperm, and so you’re getting them
from the ovum of the egg and the mother’s egg is already prepacked not with two or three of these, but with 200 of these guys, and each human cell as it divides, will have about 200
mitochondria per human cell. If it’s a neuron however, in your brain or peripheral nervous system, 2,000 mitochondria in the axon, are in the nerve body of that cell. We are teaming with somewhere around 14 quadrillion mitochondria, and it is fascinating and not surprising that the microbiome has to talk. If you’re gonna balance
40,000 species of bacteria with five million species of fungi, with 300,000 species of parasites, with somewhere around
10 to the 31 viruses. That’s one with 31 zeroes after it. This is such a vast amount
of biology on the planet and we’re taught to fear it. Antibiotics, antivirals. Get your flu vaccine. All this stuff. If that microbiome was against us, we would have never developed into multi-cellular systems. An earthworm could have never existed, if the bacteria, the fungi, the parasites, and the viruses weren’t for it. There’s so much biology. The fungi alone, that kingdom of fungi with five million species, has 125 trillion genes
that we’ve found so far, and you can’t even
comprehend how minuscule our 20,000 genes are to 125
trillion genes on the planet. We do almost no work
biologically on this planet and yet, what we’re really doing is destroying the ecosystem. We’re destroying is
through all of our actions. The soils, the water
systems, the air we breathe, the clouds that carry rain. We are contaminating
with antibiotic residues. – This is an action hour, and we want to focus a lot on action and steps that individuals can take. – Yes. – Based on what we’re learning to apply all this and get results. Let’s talk for a minute now about what do with what
you’ve just been telling us. Specifically, it’s chilling. I’m sure I’m not the
only one who is thinking oh my gosh, what does it mean? What are the implications of soil that is not able to nourish food in the way that it once did? We’ve heard all these studies about the value of lycopene in tomatoes for fighting prostate
cancer and other ailments. What if some of those
studies are no longer valid because the tomatoes are now devoid of some of the nutrients
they used to have, and more to the point, for somebody who is wanting to take advantage of the
health giving value of plants and wants their plants
to carry that value, what do we need to know? Is this the call to go organic? Is it a call to support farmer’s markets? Do we have to grow it ourselves? How do we, not just, as an individual, I can’t save the world’s soil, but I want to support the farmers who are doing the right thing, and I want to take
advantage of the nutrients that they’re putting
in the food they grow. How do we do that? – I’m very excited to tell you that as single consumer
you can change the world and save the world’s soils. That’s my big statement. We started a non profit this year that is partnering with a
bunch of orgs around the world as well as thousands of
farmers around the world. Our goal is to regenerate
five million acres that are currently under
chemical agriculture to not organic, because organic does not
improve soil quality. In fact, a lot of organic farms have worse soil quality
than the chemical farms that neighbor them, and so our organic certification has not included soil health
or nutrients in the plants as part of their category of
evaluation or requirements. You can grow really crappy
food in really crappy soil and call it organic. It’s still gonna be just as devoid of a lot of those chemicals, or a lot of those medicinal qualities that you’re talking about, with the lycopene for example. How did that happen? How did we kill the soils, before we get to the obvious solution which is stop doing what we’ve been doing, but what we did is we started to rely on first petroleum fertilizers
in the 1950s and 60s. We created the green revolution. We created all these massive monocrops of corn, soy bean, alfalfa, sugar beets, and we got all pleased with ourselves because we were growing
hundreds of thousands of miles of monoculture, and we’re gonna feed the world. You fast forward then the 50 years and you find out we
really made a transition from good soil management, and improving soil quality, to just putting tons and
tons of chemical inputs somewhere around that 1960s 1970s phase. In the mid 1970s we created
the Roundup molecules and so Monsanto put Roundup on the market which has been on the news a ton recently because of its cancer
capacity and all of this. Roundup became a weed killer. Although never, interestingly,
patented as such. It was patented as a chelating agent, meaning it tears minerals
out of soil and plants, and ultimately has an
antibiotic, antifungal and anti parasite. It turns out this chemical
that we’ve been spreading across our agricultural land worldwide, now at the tune of four and
a half billion pounds a year we are pouring in a chemical that blocks the ability of the soil to
make your building blocks, your essential amino acids. It blocks the alkaloid production. The medicine in your food, and this got really bad in
the 1996 range and after when we created the GMO crops obviously. The genetically modified
crop has allowed us to spray corn, soybean, alfalfa, sugar beets, directly with this chemical, that would block the medicine in the food. That’s I believe what started to happen, is we started to grow food
devoid of its medicine, just empty calories and
sugars and macromolecules lacking the minerals that have been chelated out of the soils by glyphosate and the alkaloid medicines
that would have been there had not been in the face of this chemical. We destroyed the ecosystem. We’ve killed 97% of the
grasslands and soils in North America now
over the last 30 years and we’re fast on meeting
that same number worldwide. Parts of Asia, South America, Africa, are even more depleted
than we are at this point. We’ve killed a massive swath of the soil. We’re now down to just viable soil, kind of in the tundra areas
of Canada and northern Russia, but outside of those spaces we’ve killed around sources of intelligence
and the microbiome, and so as we start to
look at this as consumers we can realize you do control all of this as a single consumer. What you can do is start
to grow food again, because in 1945, at the
end of World War II, we were growing 40% of our food chain in our backyard gardens, and so the victory gardens of the U.K., and the allies over in
Europe as well as the U.S., 40% of our food was being
just produced in the backyard. Now we produce less than one tenth of 1% of our food in our backyards. We basically outsourced our
food production to mega farming, and we created not just megafarms, but we created the Monsantos
and the Bayers of the world through our lack of participation. How do we take this back? We simply start taking responsibility for growing our own food. If you feel completely inable to participate at that
level, then just grow plant. I encourage people to grow one mint plant in their window, just to remind yourself, you have the capacity to grow things. To participate in this biological cycle. If you can’t do that, then certainly you need to get to the farmer’s market on the weekend. You certainly need to join
that CSA to know your farmer, because if you know the farmer, if you become part of that, then the revolution starts to happen. If you really want to step things up and do the five million
acre transformation with us then our org can help you do that, but in the long run it’s fix the soil. In the short run, how do we fix you, before the soil is back, because right now your children are suffering from attention
deficit, asthma, allergies. It’s environmental allergies, food. Your attention deficit disorders. You’ve got anxiety
disorder, sleep disorders. You’ve got precocious puberty. You’ve got slow growth
rates in these children. You got severe insomnia,
and attention problems. Chronic pain and fatigue syndromes by the time they’re 18, 20 years old trying to go through college,
and they’re vulnerable, and they’re all suffering
from this collapse of focus, and they can’t find a path, so we have this new era
where 20 years olds, 30 year olds are still
living with their parents, because they can’t get a footing. Not just economically, but neurologically. They can’t get that footing, that sense of here I am. This is my purpose. This is what I want to do with my life, and they’re just walking
around in this fog, and so this is what my passion is. How do we fix that generation now? Because we don’t have time to wait the 15, 30 years that
it’s gonna take for us to completely revolutionize
the 135 million acres of ag in North America. What do we do in the short run, is get those kids reconnected
to nature in a deep way. Get a kid outside, into
multiple ecosystems. You have to realize how
limited their microbiome is because of their macro ecosystem. If you wake up in a drywall house with forced air conditioning
and heating systems and then get in an air conditioned plastic off gassing car, get dropped off at school and go into a weird microbiome of mold, fungi, and yeast, and all these weird
elements of few species growing in the HVAC ducts
of some old molding school and then they go home and sit around playing computer games in the basement, and they’ve got more mold exposure, they’ve got no natural ecosystem, and so their microbiome
starts to look like our crops. Monoculture. The corn, soybean,
alfalfa, and sugar beats. That’s what’s happening to
the guts of our children, that become this super narrow microbiome. Of course, the response to that, we created a multi billion dollar industry that we call the probiotic industry. I think you wanted to get into that. – I did. Well Zach, you’re taking
it so broad, which I love, and we’re the Food Revolution Network, so we’re always looking at how we create the revolution in our own personal lives and on the planet, because ultimately the
personal is political. Food is so intimate. It’s so personal. What you eat literally becomes you, and it’s also social and global, and it affects people and policies and practices all over the world, and in turn those policies and practices affect every single one of us, and I love how you are illuminating for us that we eat connects us to soil, to the entire ecosystems of the planet and the ecosystems of our
own lived environments are part of us. It’s not just what we
eat, but what we absorb, and the soil, the air, the water, the environment you
surround yourself with, becomes a part of who you are. If you go into natural beauty, you may take in beauty with your eyes, but you’re actually absorbing it with your body as well. When you jump in a mountain stream, you become a different person as a result. You don’t feel it, but you actually are it. You actually absorb something
of its nature into your body. When you touch soil, when you pull up dirt out of the ground with a carrot in the middle of it, that actually becomes a part of you. Not just what you eat, but who you are, and I think that’s a beautiful way to reshape our self definition
as human beings really. That we are a part of a global ecosystem, and so what are we
surrounding ourselves with? What are the influences we
surround ourselves with, and if it’s all plastic and
formaldehyde and chemicals, then that’s gonna have an impact on how we experience ourselves, and how we actually show up, because as biological creatures, we are influenced by and participants in the entire web of life, and you’re really describing how we reweave ourselves back
into that web of life as participants and co creators, so thank you for that. Now I want to get granular, because we’ve got a lot of
questions from our members here. Let’s rapid fire, see if we
can address some of these. Antibiotics. A lot of people are asking about it. There’s more than a prescription
per American per year right now of antibiotics, so most of us have taken them a lot of times in our lives. They kill gut bacteria, and
they damage the microbiome. Obviously, when your life is on the line and you’re facing a
certain kind of illness they have a place. Antibiotics saved my life
when I was three months old but I’ve only taken them twice in my life. That was one of them, but some of us do need to
use them from time to time. How do you replenish your microbiome after that impact? What are some of the top tips? – Very good. Yeah, quick look at the antibiotic phase. Antibiotics over a one or two week period will wipe out about 80% of
your microbiome diversity. It is a nuclear bomb to that population. You walk away from that with very limited microbial diversity measurable in the gut. The exciting thing is that
recovers pretty quickly in a healthy system. When I say a healthy system, it means you still have your tonsils, and you still have your appendix, and you can get outside. In that setting, we can see
pretty excellent recovery of the majority of that by 30
days out from the antibiotics. That’s a very fast recovery. If we do fecal transplant where we sample your stool
before the antibiotics and give you that back
in the form of capsules, then we can recover it maybe 20 days, instead of 30 days, but eating your own stool
is a leap for most of us, whereas if you just wait the 30 days, you can really regain that microbiome and these are journal articles coming out of Cell most recently. Many others have been done, but the best studies today were published in the rigorous peer
reviewed journal of Cell in September of 2018. Just a few months back,
we see this new data. Interestingly, we’ve been in this deluge of information around probiotics, and we need to back up for a second and ask what a probiotic is. Probiotic you pick up from the shelf and it says 25 billion
or 50 billion bacteria, and it’s like oh wow, that’s gonna repopulate my gut instantly. Thank goodness because I
just took an antibiotic. I must be devoid, but if you flip it around on the back you realize it’s 25 billion
or 50 billion copies of this same three bacteria, or the same seven bacteria. A healthy ecosystem again, is somewhere around 20 to
40,000 species of bacteria. If you take three species
over and over again, that 25 to 50 billion copies, you’re never gonna equal 30,000 species. It’s physically impossible. More concerning than that, is if you start to lay down row crops of corn all over the place,
and you do a monocrop, you can’t grow biodiversity, and that’s what they’ve
proved in these Cell studies both in mice and in humans, that showed that we completely halt the recovery of the
microbiome after antibiotic if you’re taking a probiotic. You’re way better off taking
zero than any probiotic which is mindblowing to a physician who thought this was our
best tool for gut health was the probiotic industry, and so for all of us, we’re having to reset quickly now to say oh my gosh, we need to think way more holistically, about the gut. We can’t be micromanaging, and thinking we’re smart enough to give three species of cow bacteria. Important to note that all of
the probiotics on the market don’t come from human biome They’re derived from cow intestine biome, and we were told they don’t
colonize the human gut so it’s safe to take
cow intestinal bacteria because it doesn’t actually
colonize the human intestine. In fact, unfortunately it
showed the exact opposite. That in a study out of Cell, it showed that not only was it becoming the dominant
species at the gut level, in the lumen of the intestine, we see the infiltration
and setting up shop of these bovine bacteria. Unfortunately the probiotics are not only halting our recovery, and in the human study that
took it out to six months. Even at six months the probiotic arm has been kept from
getting back to baseline whereas 30 days with no probiotics, they fully recovered. We realize we’ve been screwing
things up with probiotics. We’re so eager to throw
a pill at everything. We forget what the biome is, and you described it so
beautifully, so aptly. We are an extension of
this macro ecosystem. It’s not about what you’re eating. It’s what you’re breathing and touching and really communing with
in nature that’s gonna, you’re gonna be an extension of that. You want to, if you take an antibiotic, your solution is get outside immediately. Get dirt between the toes. Get dirt in the fingertips. Go dig in the sand. Build a sand castle with
the kids on a beach. Get out there into multiple ecosystems. In Virginia we’re very
fortunate around here. I sent my patients to
five different ecosystems in the course of a month. You’ll go up to the Appalachian trail and you’ll do some waterfall hikes there and then you’re gonna go
down to the Great Smokies and the Southern Appalachian area and you’re gonna catch some of the oldest ecosystems of ferns and
fungi and stuff like that down in the woods of the Great Smokies. Then you’re gonna go out to the swamps and then you catch that. It’s just amazing, and then off to the
beach of Virginia Beach and you got all these five ecosystems that are now going to make you a complete human being. – Wow, that’s gotta be one of the most unique prescriptions I’ve ever heard of from a medical doctor. I love it. – It’s an awesome one. I’ve seen it heal families even, because ultimately human relationship is an outspringing of that relationship that we have with nature, and we all run around in
plastic offgassing cars and cubicles and offices
and artificial air. We show up artificially
in our relationships. We’re not whole for each other, and so I watch these prescriptions not only fix the inflammatory problem, I watch them heal relationships, because suddenly everybody’s taking a road trip to the beach. When do we do that enough? Wow, how did we get ourselves into this and the answer is really screens. We are staring at screens. We are dumbing ourselves
down with Netflix. We got this whole cascade
of convenience distractions that we can put in front of us, and we’re forgetting to
freaking get outside. – Yeah, okay, so many questions. I’m gonna ask you if we can aim to keep rapid fire, a
minute or less answers, just so we can get to lots of them. Back to probiotics, would you say that fermented
foods are beneficial because they have a broader
spectrum of bacteria in them? – Very good question. – [Ocean] And if so which ones. – Yeah, so a majority of the
fermented foods on the market are actually made by probiotics, so you have to read the labels, right? What you’re looking for is
wild fermented products. Wild fermentation is where
you’ve exposed the vat to the air for a period of time. Usually days or weeks, to get a hugely diverse
biome into that food. A wild fermented sauerkraut may have hundreds if not thousands of
species of just lactobacilli, and a few others. Let alone some of the more esoteric ones. Massive biodiversity in
a wild fermented food. I’m a huge fan. My favorite one, miso soup. It is the power house. A miso is fermented
for a minimum of a year but all the good misos over in Japan are three to seven year ferments. Whole Foods just started
carrying a three year ferment that I’m very excited about, but it’s usually pretty hard to find those long ones in the U.S., but three year fermentation
is really exciting. Means that a single bean now has been processed thousands and thousands and thousands of times creating intelligence. Go after the fermented food. Kimchi, sauerkraut. A huge fan of the misos and
get those good guys in there. – Now we gotta talk about prebiotics, which feed the good guys. We know that soluble fiber in particular seems to be beneficial in feeding them. What are some of your favorite options for the prebiotics foods that help shore up the microbiome, and give our bacteria the nutrients they need to thrive? – Awesome. Carrots, beets, turnips, whole foods. A prebiotic in a capsule is
a very narrow spectrum again of fiber or sugar alcohols and the like, and that’s actually gonna feed only a very narrow part of the biome. We have got to quickly
come to terms with the fact there’s no such thing as
good guys and bad guys in the gut anymore. Nature never is out to harm. Nature is always there to create balance. We used to think that the
bacteroides were the good guys and the firmicutes were the bad guys and this was a big support
for the plant based diet that we all love. That plant based diet seems
to support the bacteroides, and we thought oh my gosh,
that’s why we’re getting healthy. It turns out that if you start missing the firmicutes you get cancer too. You gotta have this balance of bacteroides and firmicutes and
everything else in between and we’re starting to
really start to realize there is no such thing
as a pathogen out there. There’s only a lack of balance, in the greater ecosystem in the train. – Thank you. Also by the way I love
Jerusalem artichokes, jicama. – Oh my God, one of my favorites. – Asparagus. Those are some good ones too. Onions, actually. The whole allium family. Garlic also really good
for feeding the bacteria. – Hugely, yeah. Don’t forget to cut up the entire scallion or the whole chive. Cut up the greens and
use those in your food. We tend to just use that white end tip and we’re missing so many of the nutrients in that onion when we miss the greens. – Yeah. Tracy asked us about candida, and the best way to address it when there’s a yeast overgrowth. – Absolutely. This is perfect. We see this in our soils too. On a farm when you damage the soil, the fungi and alkaloids
are first to recover. Subsequently, they’ll call in the complex mycelial
beds and everything else that will become the safe
haven for the bacteria and the microbiome. If you have a yeast problem, if you’ve got candida albicans
or something like that, you don’t actually have a yeast problem. You have a terrain problem, and the yeast is the
first thing to show up to try to heal you. Of course we then throw you on antifungals and anti yeast compounds
and everything else, which clearly candida, what
we’re really doing there is making the soil yet even more barren. Instead of fighting the candida, I remind patients we just need
to welcome back in the biome. That’s when you gotta get outside. You need to change your macro ecosystem. You need to change your diet radically. Always go to the root
vegetables at that situation. You need far more nutrients. Far more fiber if you’ve
got a candida problem. You probably also need
more acid in your gut. By age 35 or 40, we start
to lose the acid production in our stomach which makes it very hard to liberate some of the critical nutrients from our food, and so I
supplement quite aggressively, with everything from apple cider vinegar. I love the organic apple cider vinegars all the way to hydrochloric
acid supplements and the like. We gotta get healthy
acids into the stomach to really lead the charge on getting these nutrients bioavailable. – Thank you. Pat asks is it possible to have difficulty digesting raw vegetables? Been eating a large
salad every day for lunch but once a week or so I
get the worst stomach pain and bloat like I’m six months pregnant. About 30 or 40 minutes after eating. Any thoughts on what might be causing that or difficulty with raw
vegetable digestion? – You are one of the 30% of my clinic that helped me discover
these molecules in the soil. What we found with you guys is that you have a profound
permeability to the intestines. That has been setup by the
Roundup in the food chain and remember even when
you’re eating organic, the rainfall has about 75% of the rain contaminated with Roundup. 75% of the air we breathe is
contaminated with Roundup. These trace amounts of this molecule that will hit your biome,
causing antibiotic effect and then break the
velcro between the cells of your intestines and
of your vascular system to create leaky gut, leaky brain, and so you’re a leaky gut person and the reason why the raw vegetables are causing so much discomfort especially as it accumulates
over the course of a week, is due to the amount of insoluble fiber that’s slipping through the gut lining. The insoluble fiber is what was making my patients
more inflamed, not less, when they had that leaky gut. The first step is to go
to steamed vegetables. I’m a huge fan of not challenging
the gut with all of that. You can also juice to get the nutrients without as much fiber in there, but I’m a bigger fan of
just cooking the food and really getting it there, especially being careful
with the nightshades. Your peppers and your
tomatoes and the like. These guys can really cause some issues. Eggplant. When you’re in that leaky gut
and poor microbiome status. In that situation we would
get these soil nutrients back into your gut, so there’s oral sources for those in the form of dietary supplements. You get the dietary supplement
soil extract in there and then get that gut starting to really rebuild the microbiome as you get in touch with the fermented
foods, the cooked foods, and all of that. Remember in that leaky gut phase, you also are gonna be pretty sensitive to the fermented foods. It only takes a tablespoon
of a good kimchi, or a couple spoonfuls of miso soup, to do a whole lot of good for the micro ecosystem reinforcement there. Huge fan of go easy, go gentle on that gut in the first phases. – Thank you. Less than 3% of the American population gets the recommended amount of fiber. We all know the fiber’s
critical for gut health and there are many
different kinds of fiber and they all have their place and things, but some people who start moving towards a whole food plant based diet are getting more fiber. After all there’s no fiber
in any animal products and there’s none in bottle of oils and very little in sugar or white flour, so when you eat a lot more plants you get a lot more fiber, and sometimes that can have
some unexpected consequences. Some people experience flatulence. Some people experience more
frequent bowel movements which can be welcome for most, but not for everybody. What do you tend to say to people who are experiencing maybe even some digestive discomfort? Especially we see this with legumes, and there are oligosaccharides and other factors there as well, but fiber is probably a big part of it because a lot of people who eat legumes are getting a lot more fiber, especially when they’re swapping out beans for beets so to speak. What do you think can help mitigate some of those potential discomforts and how long do they last? – Proper preparation is key here. When you’re looking at the legumes or you’re looking at the bean family, these are compounds that
are prone to fermentation. They have a lot of proteins in there that are slow to digest. I think it’s probably
the protein digestion of fermentation that you’re experiencing more than a fiber problem when you experience bloating and the loose stools and
all of that going on. I’m a huge fan of remembering, we oughta get that fermentation process before it hits your gut. Especially if you’re suffered from a poor microbiome in the gut before. Chronic antibiotic usage for chronic lyme or poor dysbiosis for attention deficit or autism for the children. These conditions tends to make you relatively irritable with things like the super fiber, vegetables, as well as the lectins
and other things in food. I happen to disagree with Dr. Gundry. I don’t think lectins
are bad for you at all. I think they’re actually
phenomenally important for the medicinal quality of food. They only became an issue when we forgot how to prepare food properly. What I mean that further is soaking these beans and legumes. Presoak until you get the gas discharge. If you presoak dry
beans for 24 to 36 hours you’re gonna realize why you
have gas when you eat beans because the amount of gas
coming off those things. They’ll be piles of bubbles of gas coming out of the water. You’re like what the hell
is going on with this water? It looks like a foaming mass
of science experiment going on and I just put black beans in
water, and what’s happening, is you’re getting early
digestion fermentation of some of those complex
carbohydrates, proteins, and the like that are in there. If you let that off gas for 24 hours and then you put it in your slow cooker for another eight, 10, 12 hours, you’ve really done all that off gassing before it gets into your gut. The slow preparation is key, especially with those
sensitive microbiomes. Go slow, especially with the beans. You don’t have to go that long with a soak for your lentils and legumes, but at least a six to
eight hour soak on those before you cook them up will help you with that journey there, and in addition lead the meal with that fermented product. A little bit of apple cider vinegar in the water right before your meal, and then add a little bit of kimchi, sauerkraut or the like
right before the meal. A couple tablespoons to
get that digestive gut ready for that heavier lifting that it’s gonna have to do as those plant based proteins
and the like come in. – Thank you. I’ll also add that I often. Kimchi, sauerkraut, they’re very salty, and I actually consider
them a salt source, and I often use them to season my food along with, and kimchi’s
also a spice source which is pretty awesome. A typical lunch for me, sometimes dinner, sometimes breakfast, to be totally honest, is gonna be some quinoa, some legumes, and a big nice helping
of kimchi or sauerkraut, and then I’ll have some
kale or other veggies and mix that all together, and it’s a one course feast really, which is pretty darn nourishing. Thanks for that. We have a couple questions about testing. Barbara asked about
Viome, which tests stool. Is that an accurate way to test? Then Megan asked what test or tests can we request from a family physician and do we have to see a
functional medicine doctor to be properly tested? How can we gather data on our own unique challenges, deficiencies,
or where we’re at and do you think Viome or other tests are helpful in that process? – I use these tests
extensively in research and so when we’re doing clinical research, well use Viome or uBiome
or one of these stool microgenome analyses, but for an individual
to try to draw results, were not there yet with the field so I think you’re wasting your money unfortunately with Viome right now because it’s gonna show you that you have a deficient microbiome
in some niche or cranny, but you can’t go in and go fix that. It’s gonna tell you, you’re low in six species of clostridium. The only place you’re gonna go find that clostridium out in nature, and from that air
fermentation, everything else. I would much rather put the $700 or $1,000 back in your pocket, and say go eat healthy. Get outside. Get that weekend at the
beach in for that $1,000, instead of doing a test to
tell you what we already know, which is you are an American, therefore you are deficient
in microecosystem. We know that Americans are carrying around 10% of what our potential microbiome should probably look like. That’s best case scenario. We are all deficient. I’d much rather see
you put this in to play for the healing process,
rather than a bunch of tests. – Thank you. Jill asked about fecal transplants. You touched on it earlier. Mainly in the context of people transplanting some of their own feces as a way of recovering from antibiotics, but we’re also seeing some
interesting experimentation being done with the feces of relatively healthy microbiomed people, that are then being transplanted
surgically I believe in to people who are
struggling with conditions from autism to other challenges. What’s your thought about that? Do you think we’re gonna
see a lot more of that in the next generation? – Yeah, so microbiome transplant is done via colonoscopy
rather than surgery and so they stick a
scope through the rectum and you’ll go all the way
up the ascending colon or descending colon and
across the transverse colon down into the cecum
where the small intestine combines with the colon, and then you’ll spray the stool in there and get that microbiome transplant at this juncture between the
small bowel and the colon to make sure the species find home. If you have an intact appendix, it’s important to remember that that’s your database. Sitting right at that juncture between small intestine and colon. When you take an antibiotic, we believe that’s the main place that you repopulate from, is that blind pouch
that acts as the library or data bank in case
there’s wide spread injury through the lumen of the gut. Over the next few days and weeks the appendix and the tonsils doing the same thing
in the upper G.I. tract repopulate with their nooks and crannies protecting those micro ecosystems and so you have fecal transplant capacity even within your own physiology. If we go and do the colonoscopy and do all this tricky stuff, to do this we put you at risk. First of all, those are
not low risk procedures, and so there’s some risk affiliated and more problematic, and we see this to be short lived, and so the autism trials, are where we do a high dose oral instead of colonoscopy, where we’re encapsulating
enteric coated capsules and try to get as much
of that fecal material. Unfortunately, it doesn’t
distribute across the gut as ideally as it would. You end up with a lot more
in the small intestine than you do in the colon there, which is the opposite of biology there. Nonetheless, we’ve shown
some benefit to that but it’s very short lived, so if you stop doing fecal transplant within about four weeks, you’ll revert to your previous microbiome. That again is showing us, we are an extension of
our ecosystem around us. We can’t look to fecal
transplant to replace nature. You have to get back out into nature. You have to become an extension of your greater ecosystem for this to become a durable result. – I’m gonna want to get outside today. I love it. We had a question from Jack who said, I’ve heard for awhile
that 90% of our serotonin is produced in our gut, which suggests there’s a big connection between the standard
American diet and depression but I’ve also heard that the
serotonin produced in the gut is not the same as that
produced in the brain and it can’t cross the
blood brain barrier. Although it has its own
important functions. So can you clarify the connection between gut health and
happy head hormones, and relatedly, Cindy asked, can you explain the brain gut connection? – Beautiful. The gut brain axis has become one of the fastest
growing parts of science in the last 10 years. There’s many many different elements or layers within this relationship between the gut and the brain, but some of the simple brush strokes for you to realize, is that your caller is exactly accurate in that 90% of the serotonin, more than 50% of the dopamine, another 40% of the body’s dopamine is made in the kidney tubules, so between the gut and kidneys, you’re making 90% of the
dopamine, 90% of the serotonin. We’re making this huge thing. The reason why we thought well maybe this doesn’t actually
ever get to the brain, is because of that blood
brain barrier story but recent data coming out
of UCSF and USD and the like have been showing us that it doesn’t have to go through the blood brain barrier. The nerves are literally directly talking to the enteric endocrine cells that line the gut. 10 to 15% of the cells
that line your intestines are not epithelial cells
that are responsible for absorption and nutrient delivery. Instead they’re these endocrine cells that will produce serotonin,
dopamine, and the like. Aha moment number one is those
afferent nerves of the gut tie right into those
enteric endocrine cells to extract serotonin,
dopamine, whatever’s being made and send that upstream
via neural connections. Not the blood system. You don’t have to pass
the blood brain barrier. You’re already in it. At the enteric endocrine cell level. Even more bizarre coming out of UCSF is some recent imaging showing us that afferent nerve
doesn’t just wrap around the enteric endocrine cell
for the information delivery, it actually sticks in a nerve ending right up through the gut barrier into the bacterial millieu. This is so freaking cool for me. This is the coolest thing
I’ve even been a part of is starting to appreciate
that the microbiome is literally talking
directly to your brain. You don’t have a single
synapse or blood system or lymphatic system between the two. Furthermore, scientists
have now started to isolate the bacteria that have to be present on the enteric endocrine cell and at that afferent interaction to do the communication of the brain. Your enteric endocrine cell doesn’t make serotonin, dopamine, without the correct microbiome sitting on it. If we give you an antibiotic, we increase your risk
of major depression 24% in the next 12 months. Anxiety, 17%. If you get two course
of antibiotic in a year which is very common. Two UTIs or a UTI and bronchitis. Two courses 54% increase
in major depression. A 44% increase in
generalized anxiety disorder. This is happening all the time due to antibiotics
prescribed by physicians. Now extrapolate that out to a food system where we pour five X the amount of antibiotics by poundage into our feed and animal production primarily. The cows, the sheep, the
goats, the pork, the poultry. We’re using about 32 or 34
million pounds of antibiotics in that area where we use about seven or eight million pounds in humans. This massive quantity
of antibiotics out there killing microbiome,
causing major depression, a drop in neurotransmitters. Not just in humans, but as a population of eukaryotic multi cellular organisms on Earth are having a collapse in our ability to transmit energy, to
create neural intelligence, to fuel creativity. We’re having these collapses as a multi-species system through the loss of the microbiome. – Wow, thank you. We have a very specific
question from Carol and also Rosie and Deepak
asked for us to address it which is, could you address
the issue of reflux, proton pump inhibitors, and their effect on the microbiome? – Awesome. Great questions. The famous proton pump inhibitors. Omeprazole and pantoprazole and these drugs that got developed in the 1990s to completely shut down the ability of the
stomach to make acid. This was the beginning of our epidemic what’s now known as SIBO, or small bowel overgrowth. When you stop acid
production in the stomach you suddenly prevent, or you take away the barrier between your sinus and
upper respiratory flora and your small intestine. Now every night when you go to sleep, you’ve got that little
bit of post nasal drainage coming out of your sinuses, dripping down the back of your throat, going through the stomach, and ending up in your small intestine. You’re now colonizing the small intestine as if it were a sinus. This is a problem. All the wrong bacterial species are there. You’re gonna have more bloating, more absorption issues,
more inflammatory issues, more autoimmune conditions. All of that, as you put the wrong flora in the wrong space, because you didn’t acidify the stomach. If you scope somebody whose
been on a PPI for a year the stomach looks disgusting. It’s like this white pale anemic looking smooth slick surface. A healthy stomach is this pink rough coral like reef type structure that’s so good at sensing
what’s in the stomach starting to do complex digestion. PPI destroys the stomach lining and puts it into this
atrophied anemic state. No acid production, no nutrient
absorption and detection. You’re really starting to screw up what would become small
intestine absorption with PPI. I do the opposite in my clinic. I’m huge for the hydrochloric acids, and the vinegars and everything else to get more acid in the stomach and we find that digestion
improves with the more acid, depending on how severe your heartburn is you might have to get this
microbial intelligence from the soil, so that
nutrient into the gut before you can start
putting the acid in there but you gotta get off that PPI. One of the primary side
effects of PPIs is pneumonia. Pneumonia in the first
six months after a PPI is the number one reason
for hospitalization which is interesting
because it’s showing you that the immune system of your lungs is part and parcel to the amount of acid in your stomach, and so the flora changes. You start to have weird bacterial flora through the whole gut, stem to stern, and now you’re seeding your lungs through the post nasal drainage and through the reflux
and everything else. You’re starting to get acid reflux of bacteria that should be down in the small intestine, up into the back of your throat, ultimately colonizing the lungs and now you’ve got pneumonia. The PPIs I think are another disaster. – Thank you. I have a question for you that follows up on that. I know we’re running long here, but I’m just so fascinated
by this conversation. Very quickly, you’re talking about acidification in the
stomach being important. We also hear a lot of talk about the so called alkaline diet, and having the alkaline
acid balance in the body and wanting to be more alkaline. People are drinking alkaline water. They’re eating baking soda in some cases to try to alkalinize the body. How does that interplay
with your recommendation to consume more acidic things for the gut? – I just preface with saying, I think everybody has the right part. I think everybody that’s in this field that’s made huge mistakes,
including myself. I prescribed probiotics for a long time before I realized how
much harm I was doing. Here we are again, harming
people’s understanding by a screw up in our own understanding as scientist physicians, and remember that most of these companies that are out there pumping
in alkaline this or that are actually marketing
teams, not scientists. The problem comes from the
fact that the word alkaline is so darn similar to the word alkalinity and they are completely different biochemical characteristics. Alkaline describes pH. A high pH, the opposite of low pH acid, is an alkaline substance, and so you mentioned baking soda. These are alkaline substances. Let’s take a look at alkaline water. Finish that though with alkalinity. Alkalinity has nothing to do with pH. You can have high alkalinity, and an acidic food. A good example of this is actually apple cider vinegar. It’s an acid substance
with very high alkalinity. Alkalinity is the measure
of the amount of acid that compound can absorb or neutralize. That is your friend. What we want is high
alkalinity in our diet, not alkaline diet. That screw up in our understanding of those two words, has really messed up consumer messaging for the last 30 years. Kangen water was the first. The 1960s was a different brand. 1970s come out. Alkaline water can really change things because we know that acidic
accumulation in the body seems to correlate with chronic
inflammation and the like and so this whole fad get started and it failed quickly. The science around it failed. Came off the market, and this multi level
marketing company comes along with a new marketing campaign of an alkaline, alkaline, alkaline. This is the solution, so we all started drinking
pH 10 and 11 waters which has never been the case. Nature doesn’t do pH 10
water to pH 11 water. That’s extremely against
nature’s tendency. The ludicrous in biochemistry of that is that water has very very low PKA. PKA is the buffering
capacity of a substance. With a very low PKA it
means that the water has no ability to hold its pH. It’s gonna match the pH
of whatever it’s around. The second you swallow pH 11 water, even before you swallow it, as it hits your mouth, it’s gonna go to a pH
7.5 right in your mouth. It’s gonna match your
mouth pH instantaneously because it has very low PKA. In the next couple seconds as you swallow it’s gonna go to a pH
of 3.5 in the stomach, and so in the end you’ve done absolutely nothing to
change pH of the body. The only reason that you might see a short term benefit from one of these alkalizing filters, and you say well I felt
better for two weeks. How is that explained? It turns out that one of the compounds that’s made when you break water apart which is how alkaline waters are made, you break some of the H off and that creates acid, and then break some of the
OH into hydrogen peroxide and those happen to have a high pH. One of the compounds that can be released in small amounts is H2. It’s a neutral non
positive, non negative H2, or hydrogen and it’s got a nascent state. That hydrogen actually has a very profound anti inflammatory effect. But you’re typical water ionizer can only produce the
hydrogen for about two weeks, and then it will start to scale and the electric plates in there will start to get a little scale in there and you can’t make the hydrogen, so you felt better in
the first couple weeks of your alkaline water, you said ah, I must love pH 11 water, when in fact pH 11 water
had nothing to do with it. Little bit of hydrogen did and the within a month
that water filter’s become relatively useless. So if you have one of
these units, set it back. You can change the pH
on most of these units. Set it back to a pH of seven. You’re gonna have a longer
run on your ionizing units. You don’t need an alkaline. You need alkalinity. It turns out that the water you drink will never carry alkalinity to it. It can’t absorb it, so what does? How do you get water in
with a high alkalinity? It’s in your fruits and vegetables. Your alkalinity in a cucumber, the water that’s in the cucumber is now in a gel state. It’s in that fourth phase of water and it has the ability to interact with the nutrients around it. The electrolytes, and
everything else in that cucumber to absorb acid as it’s metabolized, through the microbiome and ultimately through the liver and beyond, and so you end up with a
net absorption of acid, as you digest your fruits and vegetables. Alkalinity comes from your food. Alkaline irrelevant to human biology. – All right, thank you. Thank you Zach. Fascinating. We are not gonna get to
all of our questions. I’m gonna ask one last question, because I’m curious about it too, which is really quickly, what’s the least damaging
for the microbiome? Acetaminophen, Ibuprofen,
Naproxen sodium, Aspirin, other pain medications. How do you control pain for people who are dealing with it,
especially chronically, in the least damaging way? – Every one of those is
disastrous to the microbiome with chronic use. You do have to look for alternatives. My third sub specialty was in
hospice and palliative care and that’s of course where we
specialize in pain management. This is where I started to get into non pharmaceutical
management of pain, and I do this really
exclusively in my clinic now. I don’t use any pharmaceuticals
for pain management. I think they are very
ineffective over time. They make pain worse, not better, and that includes the opiates. You get worse pain with chronic opiate use than you do. If you use an opiate
or something like that it’s only gonna work for short term. A few days to maybe a week at best and then starting to get
into this vicious cycle of pain feeding, and I’m a huge fan of non
pharmaceutical management. So where does that come in? I think the most powerful
unobserved thing, or unused things in our resources is literally the human hands. We can reduce pain so much, by putting hands on one another. Just like you’re gonna get out in nature, find therapists in your life that can put their hands on you. Reiki therapist or as simple as an Egoscue physical therapist to start putting their hands on you and teaching you how to find
symmetry in your muscles. I’m a huge fan of
myofascial release therapy. These things are powerful tools for getting pain to go
away at the root cause instead of just slapping
band aids on the symptoms. We gotta get root cause of your pain which is almost always due to assymetry in the muscular skeletal system. That’s where Egoscue, E-G-O-S-C-U-E, is Peter Egoscue’s last name. Peter Egoscue started
this in the late ’80s Egoscue therapy is one of my go tos, that helps you with a quick
30 minutes of routine. On your back. It’s really not even exercise per se but it’s about getting
your skeleton stable. Find Egoscue therapy. Find a myofascial release therapist. Give you weekly at least therapy for a few months, and get yourself out of pain. It is so freeing when you find a non pharmaceutical approach to pain. If you’re gonna use something topically, then I would use Australian Dream Cream which is a couple of compounds in there that are profoundly anti inflammatory, but my favorite rally is arnica. Arnica cream is a really fantastic go to. It’s a homeopathic topical. You can also get arnica
tablets on the tongue if you have widespread, but if you’re got focal
pain you’re treating, treat topically. We use the restored compounds. The soil molecules we’re talking about earlier in the gut. We use those spray on. We use them orally to reduce pain throughout the body, because we see the microbiome upregulate your anti inflammatory cascades. Upregulate glutathione, which is your main
antioxidant in your body. Upregulate detox pathways
to reduce inflammation. Microbiome is your answer
to inflammation as a whole. Get that nutrient back in there. The wild ferments. Get the gut repaired, get outside. Get symmetric, get moving. Exercise is key to battling pain. – Thank you. I want to wrap now with taking it to a bigger picture. You spoke earlier with some
fairly chilling information about the depletion of our soil and you’ve spoken in some fascinating interviews I’ve seen from you in the past about really the extent
of the crisis we’re in spiritually and physically and biologically as a species right now, as we are defiling our planet, and creating conditions that make it potentially inhospitable for humans to thrive in future generations, and there’s a lot of data that backs up the fundamental reality, that we’ve got some big problems we’re up against right now, and I would like to ask you
as we wrap up this action hour what is your take on the interplay between hope and activism, and the belief that we can change things, with radical acceptance, surrender, the interplay really
between will and surrender? How do you balance that? Because on the one thing I think as humans we have to do what we can. That’s what we got. So how do we use our will, our intention, our courage, our life, to make a contribution on this planet, and at the same time, we’re also faced with the possibility, that there are some violences and some destructions that
are beyond our control, or even perhaps our comprehension, and how do you come to terms with that, and how do you find peace in
the midst of your passion? – Ultimately the peace
comes from my experience with the afterlife. I’ve resuscitated many patients in that near death experience, as well as worked with
thousands of patients in the hospice setting, where they’re right at that veil. They’re dipping in and
out of the spiritual realm and the physical realm, and whether you’re comfortable with that concept of the
spiritual realm or not, if you feel discomfort
with that terminology then I would just welcome you to think about energy itself. We have a physical form that accounts for 0.001% of our space. A vast majority of any physical thing. Body or table or chair,
is 99.99% vacuum space, and so that vacuum space idea that is full of the electromagnetic field, our bodies emanate energy here, like these solar flares waling around and as I’ve seen patients go to the other side and get resuscitated back, they come back with
remarkably similar stories, which is a sense of peace and acceptance that is just overwhelming,
and they’re so moved. They’re in tears, over feeling 100%
acceptance of who they are and realizing that every
chapter of their life seeming failure, seeming successes, are actually part of a symphonic plan for their lives unfolding, and just the joy that comes from that realization of
nothing was out of place even though I felt like I
was filing my whole life. I suddenly realized I wasn’t. I’m fully accepted. I’m here on purpose, and I’m moving into something bigger than this physical
body after death. As you start to get comfortable with that and you start to live
life not fearing death, understanding death as the next birth or transition or transformation you start to live life much differently. That’s where we find I think the greatest peace is realizing even if we go extinct as a species, in the next seven years, as we seem to be on track for, even if that were to happen, this is now our hospice mode, and what I find in hospice patients is we can see some of the most extraordinary near clairvoyance insights and the healing of relationships and profound events happening those last few weeks and
months and year of life. So profound they change completely. That’s what we need to do as a species. We’re now in our hospice moment, but my favorite thing about
being a hospice doctor is when so often when we stop all the pharmaceutical drugs and start to put them on
just human touch regimen instead of drug regimen, they all of a sudden get better and we have to discharge
them from hospice. My hope and prayer and
frankly my expectation is that as a species we’re gonna get discharged from hospice. We’re gonna get discharged from hospice in the next few months or next few years, as we start to realize we are part of this greater ecosystem, and so our non profit
farmersfootprint.us is the website. We’ve started a documentary series. The first documentary released just a few months ago, and we are putting consumers back in touch directly with farmers to create a new and
educational system for farmers to help them move beyond organic and go to regenerative agriculture where they’re growing soil and microbiome. They’re gonna solve global warming very quickly through that methodology by pulling the carbon
out of the atmosphere and putting it back in
the soil where it belongs, and deeper than that we’re
gonna build a new economy that doesn’t include all the middle men. Banks make most the money
from our farming industry. The chemical companies
are the second to profit, so chemical companies and
banks are not the ones that should be benefiting from our incredible farmer populations. Our farmers are most resilient, problem solving, brilliant. Salt of the Earth. Want to help deliver great
product to their customers and so let them communicate with that customer again in an economy that’s fair and equitable and is built by the farmer and the consumer again and we’re gonna solve
this greater problem. I believe the five million acres that we aim to regenerate
over the next five years, are not gonna just fix those five million. It’s gonna fix the 130
million aces in America because there’s gonna
be such a huge economic incentive for those
farmers to make the jump. When they can make five X or
10 X more money every year by getting rid of the chemicals, and not spending all their money on the chemical inputs, and instead start
realizing five, seven, 10 different revenue streams out of the same piece of property, as they go to this regenerative multi species aspect of their capacity, we see human resilience. Human freedom, human passion, human sense of purpose returning. Farmers currently have one of the highest rates of suicide of any demographic in our country. They are desperate. We put 8,000 family farms out of business just in 2016 alone. Things are way worse now. The tariffs that just hit because of the current
situations politically have really screwed over our farmers. Corn this past year sold
at minus $64 a bushel. There was $64 loss for
very bushel of corn grown, which was paid out by us as taxpayers in the form of crop insurance, which is really a welfare program. In response, the USDA, asked farmers and the
crop insurance program to force farmers to grow another
three million extra acres beyond what we did last
year of corn this year. That shows how stupid the economy is around this false subsidies program that’s cooked into the farm
bill and crop insurance. We need to break that back. Kansas is 90% agricultural by acreage and yet Kansas has to
import 90% of its food. It’s not growing food anymore. It’s growing chemicals
for the fuel industry, for the food processing chemical industry, for the pharmaceutical industry. Corn, soybean the rest, are turning into
processed carbon molecules and they’re not going to end up on a plate unless it’s the weird sugar. – Yeah right and livestock
feed too of course. – Livestock feed, yes. – The good news is, as bad as things are, that’s how much better
they can be with a change, and whatever suffering you
might be experiencing right now, as a result of the status quo, the invitation here is to recognize that there is immense hope, because when you put learning
into practice in your life you can reap profound benefits, and aches and pains and
misery and brain fog and gas and bloating and
pains you didn’t even know were associated to your diet and lifestyle will suddenly shift. I remember when I stopped
eating dairy products when I was 10 years old. I suddenly could breathe through my nose, and I was like oh my gosh,
what is this sensation and I had never known throughout the first 10 years of my life that that was possible, because turns out I was allergic to dairy and it clogged my nose and when I stopped eating
it I suddenly could breathe and I didn’t know that
was one of the symptoms that I was facing. There are all kinds of symptoms you might be facing right now, and Zach I just want to
thank you for bringing in, in Whole Life Club we
look at our whole lives not just our food, and I want to thank you for bringing in our relationship to the whole of life, because ultimately what we eat and how we live is a relationship, and when we are in conscious relationship we create the conditions
for truly thriving and I know my spirits
lift when I’m outdoors, when I’m interacting with different environments and ecosystems, and I always thought that was
good for my mental health. Maybe even my spiritual health but to think that it’s critical to my physical health
and my microbiome health, is actually kind of a
new way of perceiving it and it creates more
impetus, to get out and play and enjoy and interact with
the diversity of this world, and I think one of the core things I’m hearing from you is diversity. Diversity of foods, diversity of bacteria, diversity of ecosystems,
diversity of interactions that can help to fuel the diversity of us because we are so much
more than just one thing and if you look at the disease of cancer it’s one cell that tries
to take over everything. Monocrops in a way are
a similar principle, and what I hear you really returning us to is a healthy vibrant dynamic relationship to the totality of the life. I want to thank you for that, and for everybody whose listening and participating right now, I want to thank you so much for giving us the most
precious resource you have which is your attention, your time. We’re so grateful and we hope its been a value the you to be here, and if you find that you
want to take a next step, if you want to go further
and deepen this journey I want to invite you
to join Whole Life Club if you’re not already a member because this is where you get recipes, community, wisdom, support, to ongoingly land the plane, and make it happen in your life. The issue isn’t just knowing what to do, it’s also doing what you know. Whole Life Club is designed
to be that wind at your back to steadily step by
step, day in and day out, week in and week out, give you support and resources to make it happen in your life. GO to wlc.foodrevolution.org/whole or click on the link if you’re on a broadcast page right now to find out more about what it is and how it work and how
you can join in now, and for everybody joining us I just want to thank
you again for being here and Dr. Zach Bush thank you for your brilliant, heartwarming, inspiring, informative work, and for your wisdom and brilliance and for being with us today. – Best of health to all of you. Thanks so much for having me on. – Thank you. This is Ocean Robbins, and Dr. Zach Bush signing off from this Whole Life Action Hour and thanking you so much
for joining us today. When it comes to cancer,
Alzheimer’s, diabetes, heart disease, and other chronic illness, what really matters isn’t
how many books you read, how many webinars you attend, or how much you know, what really matters at the end of the day is what you eat, and how you live. The science has given
us what we need to know. Now it’s time for action. It’s time to implement and optimize your healthy lifestyle. It’s time to get results. It’s time to say goodbye to confusion and hello to clarity. It’s time to say goodbye to bad habits, and hello to good ones. It’s time to fall in love with foods that love you back. It’s time to join a community that will support you
in achieving your goals. It’s time for Whole life clubs. Click the link to find out more and to join in now.

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