Trip Diary 2017 Explainer Video

Trip Diary 2017 Explainer Video


Every five years or so, a large-scale travel survey, known as the regional trip diary, is done in Metro Vancouver. These surveys provide snapshots of peoples’ travel patterns for a typical weekday in the fall. The 2017 Trip Diary is the latest survey in the series. In 2017, a representative sample of 28,000 households was selected from all over the region. Using an online survey or smartphone app, they submitted information about the trips made by members of their household during fall weekdays. Information such as: how many people live in their household, the origins and destinations of their trips, what modes of transportation they used, the purpose of their trips, and more. All of this collected data was then anonymized, aggregated and analyzed to provide the results. When looking at the results it’s important to understand how Metro Vancouver has changed since 2011, when the last Trip Diary took place. In that period, the region added more than a quarter of a million people and the economy went through a period of significant growth with the addition of almost 150,000 jobs. When people work, they also tend to spend more money shopping or for social activities. So we also saw retail sales grow 35%. During the same time the highway network saw lots of changes. Highway 1 and Port Mann Bridge
were widened, and the new South Fraser Perimeter Road
was built. Tolls were removed from
Port Mann and Golden Ears Bridges. The transit network saw the introduction of the Compass Card, the Evergreen Line Extension of the Millennium Line and an increase of bus service in the later years. Between 2011 and 2017, the overall number of trips in the region grew by 21% to 7.9 million trips per day. The growth rate was higher than the increase in population and jobs which was 11% and 12% respectively. Trip rates, meaning the average number of trips per person on a weekday, increased from 2.94 to 3.24. So overall, the region saw more people making trips, as well as, each person making more trips on average. The overall increase in the number of trips
resulted from increases in all modes. For most modes, growth exceeded population
and employment growth. Even though the trips in every mode grew, their share of the overall travel market, something we call ‘mode share’
showed different trends between 2011 and 2017. The walking mode share showed the most significant increase, growing from 10% to 14%. On the other hand, the region is seeing a large decline
in auto driver mode share, from about 59% to 55%. This is the largest drop in auto driver mode share,
since the study started in the mid-80s. The auto passenger mode share also grew slightly from just under 16% to 16.6%. Transit mode share decreased slightly from 12.4% to 11.7%. Cycling mode stayed more or less the same at just under 2%. When you add the walking, cycling and transit together, these sustainable modes grew from 24.2% to 27.3%. The amount of driving done by residents of the region is another key trend that has tracked. A metric known as Vehicle Kilometres Travelled, or VKT, is used. Think of it this way, a vehicle travelling for a kilometre, results in one VKT, so if we add up all the driving all the vehicles in the region do, that would be the total VKT for the region. That number increased from 39.4 to 44.3 million vehicle kilometres travelled per day, an increase of 13%. This increased driving resulted mostly from the fact that there are more people in the region. On a per person basis, the VKT remained about the same. And the length of auto driver trips
stayed the same at just over 10 kilometers. In fact, the trip lengths of all but one mode
stayed more or less the same. The exception is transit, which saw a noticeable increase in trip length growing
from 11.5 km to 13.3 km. Residents make trips for different reasons – like going to work or school, shopping, visiting a friend, or giving someone a ride. In absolute numbers, people are making more trips for every trip purpose, but the number of shopping and personal business trips grew the most dramatically at 48%. This growth increased the share of these trips from 15% in 2011 to 18% in 2017. On the other hand, the share of work and post-secondary trips went in the other direction decreasing from 24% to 20% . People travel at different times of the day,
depending on the purpose of their trip. As everyone knows, the morning and afternoon rush hours are the busiest times on the transportation system. The trip diary data shows the number of trips taking place in the morning peak period between 6 to 9am increased by 17% and the afternoon between 3-6pm increased by 18%. The number of trips made throughout the rest of the day increased even more, by between 22% and 33% depending on the time period resulting in a phenomenon known as “peak spreading”. The results of the Trip Diary are an important source of information for the understanding, planning and development
of the regional transportation system. What you’ve seen in this video is a
high-level summary of the key findings, just to give you a picture of major transportation
changes in the region. Additional insight into the rich dataset can be found on the TransLink website.

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