Tag: The New England Journal of Medicine

Lowering Infection Risk after Miscarriage Surgery

Lowering Infection Risk after Miscarriage Surgery

Each year 10 to 20% of pregnancies end in spontaneous abortion. In low- and middle-income countries, surgery is commonly performed to remove retained products of conception. Infection is a serious consequence of surgery. The Antibiotics in Miscarriage Surgery trial is a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial conducted in Malawi, Tanzania, Uganda

Treating Venous Leg Ulcers

Treating Venous Leg Ulcers

Chronic venous insufficiency can affect the superficial venous network of the lower limbs, presenting as superficial venous reflux, which causes varicose veins, and venous leg ulcerations. Studies have shown that surgical correction of superficial venous reflux can reduce venous leg ulcer recurrence more than compression therapy alone. However, the role

Efficacy of a Low-Cost, Heat-Stable Rotavirus Vaccine

Efficacy of a Low-Cost, Heat-Stable Rotavirus Vaccine

Rotavirus is the leading cause of severe gastroenteritis among young children. The two currently approved oral rotavirus vaccines require refrigeration, which makes transportation and storage difficult, especially in resource-constrained areas such as sub-Saharan Africa, which has the highest burden of rotavirus-related mortality. BRV-PV is a live attenuated vaccine containing 5

Treating Acute Gastroenteritis

Treating Acute Gastroenteritis

Every year, gastroenteritis accounts for 1.7 million visits to emergency departments by children in the United States. Probiotics represent an expanding industry with potential clinical benefits, but there are limited data supporting their use in this population. This multicenter, randomized double-blind trial included 886 children between 3 and 48 months