Spencer’s New Liver

Spencer’s New Liver


I have a disease called primary sclerosing cholangitis. It attacks your liver. It hasn’t been too bad until the last two years or so. I’ve been getting cholangitis over and over and just having to keep coming back to the hospital. It’s hard to do anything because you’re always hurting. [Music] It was actually kind of a fluke. Our pediatrician just thought that it was a viral thing and we were referred here to see Dr. Rothbomb. Dr. Rothbomb did a liver biopsy which is what diagnosed him. We’ve always worried about him and wanted to make sure that he was healthy. We’d go through a series of months and something would always kind of fall back to say what our normal is that we have a child that’s got a medical condition that we need to watch out for all the time. Within the last two years, he has begun not feeling well. He continues to get liver infections, his pain is worse, and he’s been hospitalized nine weeks since May. [Music] It’s kind of exciting. We’re ready for the next chapter and ready for him to feel better. He was very interested in the whole procedure. Of course understandably, he was nervous. Both of his parents were with him and we spent the best part of an hour talking about what was going to be involved and what was ahead for him. I don’t like waiting. That’s the hard part is you don’t know when it’s going to happen and you can’t really do anything about when it will happen. [Music] I was at work when I got the call. We went and got Spencer and we came in. We got here around 11:30 and we were in the O.R. by 3:01. I wasn’t that nervous until I got to the hospital and they started prepping me. Then it was like this is really happening. I asked if Dr. Doyle could come in and I think the anesthesiologist said that she wouldn’t have time. Then five minutes later she walked in to calm me down. She sat down next to him and she held his hand. She said, “What’s wrong?” He said, “I’m scared.” She said, “Do you trust me?” He said, “Yes, I trust you.” She’s like, “I’ve got you.” Then she said, “You’re going to go to sleep and you’re going to wake up,” and she said, “You’ll be in pain, but we’ll control the pain.” She said, “Then you can start living again.” He was—you know—such a man about the whole thing, but then right at the time of course he was really really nervous. I think part of seeing the surgeon is just sort of focuses them back and centers them back to what’s happening. It keeps everybody calm. It just made me know that she had my back, that she was going to do it the right way, and get it done [Music] He’s doing great. It’s the first time he can remember not having any pain. He can do everything that he wants to do. He’s playing baseball, he’s hanging out with his friends, and he’s being a normal teenager. Sign your driver’s license because nobody knows whenever something is going to happen that could make you be a potential donor and being a donor saves lives. There’s no question. It’s amazing what all their organs can do. If they donate their organs, they can save like six lives by one human.

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