How a gastroscopy is carried out

How a gastroscopy is carried out


This animation will show how a gastroscopy
is carried out. A gastroscopy is a test that allows your doctor
to look inside your food-pipe (oesophagus), stomach and the first part of the small bowel
(duodenum). Click the navigation arrows below the animation
screen to play, pause, rewind or fast forward the animation. This animation
contains sound. Here we show the areas of the digestive system
which can be viewed using a gastroscope. You may be given a sedative to help ensure
that you are relaxed and comfortable during the procedure.
Your doctor may spray a local anaesthetic into the back of your throat
or give you a lozenge to suck to numb your throat.
Your doctor will place a mouth guard over your teeth to protect them.
An endoscope is a narrow, flexible, tube-like telescopic camera.
It’s passed through your mouth. You will be asked to swallow to help the endoscope
pass into the oesophagus and down towards the stomach.
You should still be able to breathe normally during the procedure
sometimes a little oxygen is given. A nurse will help the doctor by using a suction
tube to remove excess saliva from your mouth.
Air is usually pumped through the tube and into the stomach to make it expand
and the stomach lining easier to see. When this happens you may briefly feel a sensation
of fullness or nausea. A camera lens at the end of the endoscope
sends pictures to a video screen. Your doctor will look at these images to examine
the lining of your oesophagus, stomach and duodenum.
Sometimes a biopsy is taken. Special instruments are passed inside the
endoscope and the doctor takes a sample of cells.
When the examination is finished, the endoscope will be taken out quickly and easily.
This is the end of the animation. Click on the animation screen to watch it
again.

7 Replies to “How a gastroscopy is carried out”

  1. My 19 year old son needs to have this procedure – but he is so nervous & scared it will feel uncomfortable or even painful.I've done some research online & it looks like a pretty quick painless & easy procedure.  I'd luv some feedback from people who have had this procedure & what's it like
    Thanks

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