15 PHRASAL VERBS about sickness in English

15 PHRASAL VERBS about sickness in English


Hi there. Welcome back to engVid, with me,
Benjamin, your teacher for today. Today we are going to be looking at phrasal verbs to
talk about health, illnesses, and sicknesses; helping you to talk about those things, whether
you’re coming to the U.K. for a visit or whether you’re doing an IELTS speaking, or you just
want to be better generally at English with more phrasal verbs
at your disposal. We are going to start today by playing an
anagram game, just to get your mind thinking so that I know you’re concentrating for the
full duration of the video. A random muddle of letters that you must take letters from
to create your own words. For example, let’s start with: “I” and then you need to create
another word from the letters, so maybe you want to start your next word with a “t”, then
you’ll probably want a vowel, so maybe “a”, oh, there’s a “p”: “I tap”. Okay? I want you
to have a go at this. You’ve got 30 seconds. Try and cross each letter off in your own
mind after you use it, because each letter written there can only be used once. Give
it a go. You have 20 seconds left. And 10. Wrapping it up now, trying to create some
sort of phrase. Five, four, three, two, one. What did you come up with, something good? Was
it about health? Which is today’s lesson. I’ll show you what I came up with. Not: “I tap”,
but: “I p…” No, I don’t relieve myself, but I use another “e” there, then another
“e”. Redeem yourself, Benjamin. Thank you. “I peel o”, I have another “l” there, “old
sc-“, and I have an “a” here, a “b” there, an “s” there: “scab”. If you fall over and
hurt yourself, you might bleed. Your then skin heals itself and you will have what is
called a scab, first word in today’s health lesson. Let’s learn
some phrasal verbs. Well done, you made it back to the second
part of the lesson. So, we have one, two, three, four, five, six, seven phrasal verbs
here, and a few more over there. I’m going to be putting this into the context of my impending,
that means about to happen… “Impending”, I’ll write that down for you. My impending
trip to India. I’m going there on Saturday. So: “come down with”. So, “come” just means,
you know, going somewhere, but if you come down… “Down” and “up” often reflect emotions
in English. If you come down with something, it means you’re coming… You’re picking up
some kind of illness, you become unwell. So: “you come down with” means you get… You get
sick. I hope that I don’t come down with anything when I am there. So after the “with”
you list a general category or you specify what you are coming down with;
a bug, an allergy. Okay. “To be blocked up”, the blockage is referring
to the nose. Okay? Because if you pick up a cold, then you will suddenly have lots of
stuff in your nose, so you don’t want to be blocked up. Okay? “To be blocked up”. I don’t
imagine that I will be blocked up, because “blocked up” we think of more with colds, with
being in a colder place. I’m not expecting to be blocked up
when I am in India. “Throw up”, possibly or “bring something up”.
So, “throw” and “up”, this is a movement coming from your stomach up, up, up, and throw. “Throw
up” is to be sick, hopefully not projectile vomiting. I better write that down as well.
“Pro-… Projectile” means throwing quite a long way. It may be that I throw up if I
get a stomach bug. “To bring something up”, so you’re bringing… It’s like you’re bringing
a nice flower to give to someone, but you’re not bringing up something very nice at all; in
fact it’s quite unpleasant. “Bring something up”, you’re bringing
your food up. “To swell up”, so this we can use to talk
about the sea as well. Okay? When there are big waves, you say: “There’s a big swell”,
it means something getting bigger. To get bigger. If I got bitten by a snake whilst I
was in India, that part of my body would swell up. In the past tense, you would say
it… Something is swollen. Swollen up. Okay. But, because I have strong body, my body has
defences and my body is going to “fight off” any illnesses. Okay? My immune system… The
immune system is your body’s defence. Your body’s defence. My body is going
to fight off any illnesses. You could also “shake off”. Okay? Shake. Dogs
shake to get dry. Okay? So, if you shake off a bug, you’re saying: “Illness, no, no, no,
no. No, thank you. I’m okay. No bug for me. No disease for me.” “To get over something”, okay? So here is…
Here is my something, I’m going to get over it. The something… Oh my goodness me, would
you see that? A misspelling. Bad Benjamin. Note for you to check out my video on praise
and criticism. Slap on the wrist, Benjamin. “Swollen” has a double “l”. Right. “Get over
something”, so the something would be a disease if I became… Or an illness, a sickness. If
I got unwell whilst I was in India, I would need to get over it, I would
need to get better; recover. “To break out into”, so you could… “To break”
means, you know, to smash something. If I was to break out into a dance, it means everything
is still, and then I break the stillness by suddenly dancing. But if I break out into an
illness, suddenly spots would start appearing on my face. “To break out” means to… Well,
to… To change… To change for the worse, really. It’s a bad change. “To put on weight”. We know what weight is, it’s
something heavy. If I was to put on weight, if I was to eat lots and lots and lots of
curries when I was in India, then weight on me, I go: “[Razzes]”. Okay? I would put
on weight. Weight would get on me. “To pack up”. “To pack up”, so when you’re
leaving… Yup. If you’re leaving a place, you pack your suitcase. You put your clothes
in your bag and off you go. It’s the same with your body. If your body is tired and
is fed up, it goes: “That will be enough, thanks, Benjamin. I’m going to pack up now.”
Okay? “I’ve had enough.” So: “to pack up” means sort of give up, break. If your
body packs up, it stops working properly. “To pass out”. So, “out”, we have this idea,
the preposition takes us away from something. Yup. The way out is through the exit. “To pass
out” means if you… If you pass on something, you say: “No thank you, I’m fine. I’ll pass.”
If you pass out, you say: “Thanks, but I’m just going to sort of fall asleep and fall
over on the floor.” Okay? Pass out: “Ooo, bonk”. It means… It’s not fully unconscious,
but it means to… Maybe to momentarily lose conscious in a sort
of non-serious way. “To come around”. This actually happened to
me when I was in India 10 years ago. I hadn’t drunk very much water and I passed out. I then
came around, I then sort of woke up again. I came around, I look around. Okay? And, so
“come around” means to wake up again after passing out, so I’ll
just put: “Wake”. “To patch someone up”. So, if your clothes
have a hole in… Most of mine do. Today’s shirt doesn’t seem to have one. If my shirt
had a patch, I would put something on top of it, like to cover up the hole. It’s the
same with your body. Yeah. After I had passed out, I had hurt my chin. So the doctor needed
to patch me up, put something there, to put maybe a plaster to connect the skin together
again, to heal it, to help it. Okay? Let’s think of: “Humpty Dumpty sat on the wall.
Humpty Dumpty had a great fall. All the king’s horses and all the king’s men couldn’t put
Humpty together again.” Well, if they knew how to patch him up, they would have been
able to put him back together again. Rather sad, this one: “pass away”. Okay? So,
again, the idea of: “No, that’s enough”, away, off you go. This is a way of saying “to die”. So,
just put that there to end on a nice cheery note. Okay. Thank you so much for watching today’s
video. My name’s Benjamin. I love engVid; it’s fun. Let’s watch some more.
See you on the next video. Bye.

26 Replies to “15 PHRASAL VERBS about sickness in English”

  1. I'm feeling a little bit cold, while I was watching the lesson my nosie was blocked up,so I flushed those stuff out. Great lesson Benjamin. I got the chance to learn so many useful vocab. Thanks a lot . ❤

  2. hello sir when are u coming to visit my country . i want to meet u my respected sir i from india i am alex adam and your student plz sir tell me when are u coming i am very eager to meet you sir.

  3. I want to thank you for your amazing work! I listen to you while driving a car every morning before my work. You inspire me to improve my English

  4. Benjamin, could you please explain that quote that you said about King and horses and men. It seemed a song or a poem. Something like that. You said after phrasal verb “to patch someone up”. Tks❗️

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